September 2, 2014
thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:
Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.
Word Counts:
Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.
Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.
A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.
Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.
But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.
General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 
Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.
As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.
Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.
World Building:
Fantasy World Building Questionnaire
Magical World Builder’s Guide
Creating Fantasy and Science Fiction Worlds
Creating Religions
Quick and Dirty World Building
World Building Links
Fantasy World Building Questions
The Seed of Government (2)
Guide to Science Fiction and Fantasy
Fantasy Worlds and Race
Water Geography
Alternate Medieval Fantasy Story
Writing Magic
Types of Magic
When Magic Goes Wrong
Magic-Like Psychic Abilities
Science and Magic
Creative Uses of Magic
Thoughts on Creating Magic Systems
Defining the Sources, Effects, and Costs of Magic
World Building Basics
Mythology Master Post
Fantasy Religions
Setting the Fantastic in the Everyday World
Making Histories
Matching Your Money to Your World
Building a Better Beast
A Man in Beast’s Clothing
Creating and Using Fictional Languages
Creating a Language
Creating Fictional Holidays
Creating Holidays
Weather and World Building 101
Describing Fantastic Creatures
Medieval Technology
Music For Your Fantasy World
A heterogeneous World
Articles on World Building
Cliches:
Grand List of Fantasy Cliches (most of this can be debated)
Fantasy Cliches Discussion
Ten Fantasy Cliches That Should Be Put to Rest
Seven Fantasy Cliches That Need to Disappear
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches 101
Avoiding Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliches
Fantasy Cliche Meter: The Bad Guys
Fantasy Novelist’s Exam
Mary Sue Race Test
Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS
Read More

thewritingcafe:

BASICS:

Genres:

  • Alternate World: A setting that is not our world, but may be similar. This includes “portal fantasies” in which characters find an alternative world through their own. An example would be The Chronicles of Narnia.
  • Arabian: Fantasy that is based on the Middle East and North Africa.
  • Arthurian: Set in Camelot and deals with Arthurian mythology and legends.
  • Bangsian: Set in the afterlife or deals heavily with the afterlife. It most often deals with famous and historical people as characters. An example could be The Lovely Bones.
  • Celtic: Fantasy that is based on the Celtic people, most often the Irish.
  • Christian: This genre has Christian themes and elements.
  • Classical: Based on Roman and Greek myths.
  • Contemporary: This genre takes place in modern society in which paranormal and magical creatures live among us. An example would be the Harry Potter series.
  • Dark: This genre combines fantasy and horror elements. The tone or feel of dark fantasy is often gloomy, bleak, and gothic.
  • Epic: This genre is long and, as the name says, epic. Epic is similar to high fantasy, but has more importance, meaning, or depth. Epic fantasy is most often in a medieval setting.
  • Gaslamp: Also known as gaslight, this genre has a Victorian or Edwardian setting.
  • Gunpowder: Gunpowder crosses epic or high fantasy with “rifles and railroads”, but the technology remains realistic unlike the similar genre of steampunk.
  • Heroic: Centers on one or more heroes who start out as humble, unlikely heroes thrown into a plot that challenges them.
  • High: This is considered the “classic” fantasy genre. High fantasy contains the general fantasy elements and is set in a fictional world.
  • Historical: The setting in this genre is any time period within our world that has fantasy elements added.
  • Medieval: Set between ancient times and the industrial era. Often set in Europe and involves knights. (medieval references)
  • Mythic: Fantasy involving or based on myths, folklore, and fairy tales.
  • Portal: Involves a portal, doorway, or other entryway that leads the protagonist from the “normal world” to the “magical world”.
  • Quest: As the name suggests, the protagonist in this genre sets out on a quest. The protagonist most frequently searches for an object of importance and returns home with it.
  • Sword and Sorcery: Pseudomedieval settings in which the characters use swords and engage in action-packed plots. Magic is also an element, as is romance.
  • Urban: Has a modern or urban setting in which magic and paranormal creatures exist, often in secret.
  • Wuxia: A genre in which the protagonist learns a martial art and follows a code. This genre is popular in Chinese speaking areas.

Word Counts:

Word counts for fantasy are longer than other genres because of the need for world building. Even in fantasy that takes place in our world, there is a need for the introduction of the fantasy aspect.

Word counts for established authors with a fan base can run higher because publishers are willing to take a higher chance on those authors. First-time authors (who have little to no fan base) will most likely not publish a longer book through traditional publishing. Established authors may also have better luck with publishing a novel far shorter than that genre’s expected or desired word count, though first-time authors may achieve this as well.

A general rule of thumb for first-time authors is to stay under 100k and probably under 110k for fantasy.

Other exceptions to word count guidelines would be for short fiction (novellas, novelettes, short stories, etc.) and that one great author who shows up every few years with a perfect 200k manuscript.

But why are there word count guidelines? For young readers, it’s pretty obvious why books should be shorter. For other age groups, it comes down to the editor’s preference, shelf space in book stores, and the cost of publishing a book. The bigger the book, the more expensive it is to publish.

  • General Fantasy: 75k - 110k
  • Epic Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Contemporary Fantasy: 90k - 120k
  • Urban Fantasy: 80k - 100k
  • Middle Grade: 45k - 70k
  • YA: 75k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)
  • Adult: 80k - 120k (depending on sub-genre)

WORLD BUILDING:

A pseudo-European medieval setting is fine, but it’s overdone. And it’s always full of white men and white women in disguise as white men because around 85% (ignore my guess/exaggeration, I only put it there for emphasis) of fantasy writers seem to have trouble letting go of patriarchal societies. 

Guys. It’s fantasy. You can do whatever you want. You can write a fantasy that takes place in a jungle. Or in a desert. Or in a prairie. The people can be extremely diverse in one region and less diverse in another. The cultures should differ. Different voices should be heard. Queer people exist. People of color exist. Not everyone has two arms or two legs or the ability to hear.

As for the fantasy elements, you also make up the rules. Don’t go searching around about how a certain magic spell is done, just make it up. Magic can be whatever color you want. It can be no color at all. You can use as much or as little magic as you want.

Keep track of what you put into your world and stick to the rules. There should be limits, laws, cultures, climates, disputes, and everything else that exists in our world. However, you don’t have to go over every subject when writing your story.

World Building:

Cliches:

Note: Species (like elves and dwarves) are not cliches. The way they are executed are cliches.

CHARACTERS

Read More

(via professorsparklepants)

September 2, 2014

rexuality:

I hate being told to do something I was already planning on doing

like I was all about doing this task, and then you told me to do it and now i am annoyed and this task is now 300x less likely to be completed

(via camwyn)

September 2, 2014

(Source: deshommesetdeschatons, via camwyn)

September 2, 2014

jawnsnough:

varysbueller:

#i really don’t know which face is funnier in the last one

#wait am i his dad
#wait are you my dad

(Source: heathledgers, via dubiousculturalartifact)

September 1, 2014

leanin:

 

Mo’Ne Davis Makes Little League World Series History In Three-Hit Shutout

The 13-year-old became the first girl to toss a complete game shutout in a Little League World Series-clinching contest Sunday thanks to a three-hit, six-strikeout effort for the Taney (Pa.) Dragons in an 8-0 victory over Newark (Del.)  At 70 mph, Davis’ pitching arm bested every boy and girl in the opposition. 

Source: Yahoo News

(via camwyn)

September 1, 2014

(Source: katiescpostcards, via xkittyfanx)

September 1, 2014
A Deadpool movie in which….

sigurdvolsung:

….he bumps into the Stan Lee cameo in the movie and just goes down on his knees and goes “oh my god, It’s God, and he’s dressed as a school crossing guard”!

(via deepthoughtswithmi)

September 1, 2014

I don’t mind.

(Source: halloawhatisthis, via 10moonymhrivertam)

September 1, 2014
lccosplay:

goldenperception:

Mother of Dragons. #leakycon #lccosplay #latergram (at LeakyCon)

THIS IS ADORABLE

lccosplay:

goldenperception:

Mother of Dragons. #leakycon #lccosplay #latergram (at LeakyCon)

THIS IS ADORABLE

(via nudityandnerdery)

September 1, 2014
40 Questions — Meme for Fic Writers

rointheta:

  1. Describe your comfort zone—a typical you-fic.
  2. Is there a trope you’ve yet to try your hand at, but really want to?
  3. Is there a trope you wouldn’t touch with a ten foot pole?
  4. How many fic ideas are you nurturing right now? Care to share one of them?
  5. Share one of your strengths.
  6. Share one of your weaknesses.
  7. Share a snippet from one of your favorite pieces of prose you’ve written and explain why you’re proud of it.
  8. Share a snippet from one of your favorite dialogue scenes you’ve written and explain why you’re proud of it.
  9. Which fic has been the hardest to write?
  10. Which fic has been the easiest to write?
  11. Is writing your passion or just a fun hobby?
  12. Is there an episode above all others that inspires you just a little bit more?
  13. What’s the best writing advice you’ve ever come across?
  14. What’s the worst writing advice you’ve ever come across?
  15. If you could choose one of your fics to be filmed, which would you choose?
  16. If you only could write one pairing for the rest of your life, which pairing would it be?
  17. Do you write your story from start to finish, or do you write the scenes out of order?
  18. Do you use any tools, like worksheets or outlines?
  19. Stephen King once said that his muse is a man who lives in the basement. Do you have a muse?
  20. Describe your perfect writing conditions.
  21. How many times do you usually revise your fic/chapter before posting?
  22. Choose a passage from one of your earlier fics and edit it into your current writing style. (Person sending the ask is free to make suggestions).
  23. If you were to revise one of your older fics from start to finish, which would it be and why?
  24. Have you ever deleted one of your published fics?
  25. What do you look for in a beta?
  26. Do you beta yourself? If so, what kind of beta are you?
  27. How do you feel about collaborations?
  28. Share three of your favorite fic writers and why you like them so much.
  29. If you could write the sequel (or prequel) to any fic out there not written by yourself, which would you choose?
  30. Do you accept prompts?
  31. Do you take liberties with canon or are you very strict about your fic being canon compliant?
  32. How do you feel about smut?
  33. How do you feel about crack?
  34. What are your thoughts on non-con and dub-con?
  35. Would you ever kill off a canon character?
  36. Which is your favorite site to post fic?
  37. Talk about your current wips.
  38. Talk about a review that made your day.
  39. Do you ever get rude reviews and how do you deal with them?
  40. Write an alternative ending to [insert fic title] (or just the summary of one).

(via jenesaispourquoi)

September 1, 2014

slayboybunny:

HAVE YALL TAKEN THE TIME TO APPRECIATE THE AMAZING DUGONG, 
image

THE ONLY OTHER NONEXTINCT ANIMAL IN THE SIRENIA AKA SEA COW FAMILY BESIDES MANATEE ?
image

it is like a smaller smoother manatee…

image

but with a DOLPHIN TAIL,
image

and a SPACESHIP VACUUM MOUTH

image

DUGONG!!
image

(via seananmcguire)

September 1, 2014

soulpatchman:

huffingtonpost:

THIS MAN HAS ALS, AND HIS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE WILL MAKE YOU LAUGH. THEN IT’LL MAKE YOU CRY

The video begins humorously as Anthony Carbajal, a photographer, dresses up in a neon bikini top and soaps up a car before being doused with ice water. 

So watch the full video here and laugh out loud at the first half and then get ready to tear up in the second half. 

assbuttinthecage

(via seananmcguire)

September 1, 2014

geardrops:

beesmygod:

hellaciousbrother:

mistomaxo:

lymphonodge:

andrewjscherman:

zooophagous:

North American River Otters

babies

lime dogs

water worm dog

aquatic fur lizard

please get this cat tube out of the water

water ferrets

(via seananmcguire)

September 1, 2014

Sam, where are you?

(Source: margahery, via hellisbucky)

September 1, 2014
adorablespiders:

a mother wolf spider with SO. MANY. BABIES.
image source

adorablespiders:

a mother wolf spider with SO. MANY. BABIES.

image source

(via seananmcguire)

11:26am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZEgIKx1Plgkgu
  
Filed under: cryoburn 
Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »